Buddhist auspicious symbols (part 1)

I’ve been trying to find some Zen (and getting away from the news) for the past week by working on these small-scale paintings of the traditional 8 auspicious symbols used in Buddhism (and also in some areas of Hinduism). They each have a specific purpose/meaning and you often see them pictured on prayer flags. I could not find one definitive reference for the order in which they are supposed to appear, so here are the White Conch, Victory Banner, Dharma Wheel and Golden Fish. These paintings have a lot of metallic details, which unfortunately don’t translate well for screen.

auspicious1

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4 thoughts on “Buddhist auspicious symbols (part 1)

  1. These are wonderful, amiga. What doing with the backgrounds is … well, hard to describe. It’s as if the symbols are suspended in front of a waterfall of color; or maybe they’re flying over rivers and we’re seeing them from above! The feeling is similar to Tomas Transtromer’s eerie little poem, “From the Snowmelt of ’66” (in Patty Crane’s beautiful translation):

    Rushing rushing water’s rumbling old hypnosis.
    The river’s flooding the car-graveyard, glittering
    behind the masks.
    I grab hold of the bridge railing.
    The bridge: a large iron bird sailing past death.

    Keep up the great work!

    • Wow! I love that description (you must be a poet or something) and the painting with the poem is a great collaboration. Thanks, as always for your valuable insight!

  2. Beautiful Sabina!!! I love the double fishes painting- symbol of fertility and probably other stuff I don’t know… Take care, Chris >

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